Movie Review: Lego: Batman (2017)

lego-batman-movie-poster

Plot: A cooler-than-ever Bruce Wayne must deal with the usual suspects as they plan to rule Gotham City, while discovering that he has accidentally adopted a teenage orphan who wishes to become his sidekick.

After seeing Lego: Ninjago (2017), I wasn’t all that impressed. It isn’t awful, but there are little to no humor for me to relate to. It’s a kids movie, and as that it just fine. I was told that I had to see Lego Batman, and lofty accolades such as “This is the only movie from DC since Nolan that has been GOOD” – I was quick to point out the wonderful Wonder Woman (2017), but I had to check Lego: Batman, out.

So I’m not putting it above Wonder Woman, but there were truths to the claim – Lego: Batman is fantastic. It is hilarious and witty and the dialogue is fantastic.

How do they give building blocks such emotions? When Batman was sad, I was sad. The movie is full of popular culture references. There are some great quips – the password for the Batcave, the subtle hinting towards double standards in gender relations, and some things about dealing with your feelings that probably flew right over the heads of the little kiddos.

Lego Batman

Will Arnett voices the perfect Batman, creating nuances in a plastic toy that couldn’t have been there without a healthy dose of talent. Michael Cera manages to be not annoying (probably because I couldn’t see that face), and is the trusty sidekick/orphan Robin. Ralph Fiennes provide heavyweight gravity to Alfred; although he sounds still like he’s enjoying himself so much and Zach Galifianakis as The Joker manages to get real emosh at times. I also loved Rosario Dawson – I’ve become team-Rosario since discovering her in Daredevil, and she’s the best Batgirl I could wish for. She puts Batman in his place and stands her ground, and she’s an all-around stand up woman.

I don’t regret one second of this amazingly funny film, and I’d definitely watch this again.

Have you seen this? Let me know!

Rating: 8/10

Movie Review: Superbad (2007)

Super bad film poster

Plot: Two co-dependent high school seniors are forced to deal with separation anxiety after their plan to stage a booze-soaked party goes awry.

Rating: 5/10

Superbad was, well, SUPER BAD. It is quite likely that I am simply now too old in my 26 years to connect to a movie based entirely on teenage hormones. Jonah Hill’s character is a prick anyway you look at it –being fat does not allow you to be a complete douchebag. Michael Cera’s character is presented as the noble teen – we all know it is a myth, noble teenagers don’t exist. Emma Stone’s character is at least something to connect to, she’s as cool as ever. The best thing about this film is certainly Christopher Mintz-Plasse as McLovin. The kid is hilarious and steals every scene he is in. Well, that is it. The movie is vulgar and over the top, the kids are gross and icky, and I really would have preferred a film exclusively about McLovin. Now THERE is a movie idea.

SB